Abbey of St. Walburga and the Benedictine nuns

Abbey of St Walburga, Virginia Dale, Kolorado, Združene države Amerike

Website of the Sanctuary

+1 970 472 0612

Every day: 7.00 am to 6.00 pm

The Abbey of St. Walburga is a small community of Benedictine contemplative nuns of the Roman Catholic Church.

Located in a valley in northern Colorado, where the high plains meet the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. All of prayer services are open to the public and the participation of guests in any part of daily public prayer is welcomed.

Abbey of St. Walburga and the Benedictine nuns

Abbey of St. Walburga

All are welcome to visit Abbey and to join in daily praise of God. As contemplative Benedictine nuns, they pray the full Divine Office which consists of seven prayer services held throughout the day. All of prayer services are open to the public and the participation of guests in any part of daily public prayer.

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As contemplative nuns, their primary duty for the Church is to pray the full Divine Office.

The goal of their life is union with God, seeking Him in community according to the Gospel and under the inspiration of the Rule of St. Benedict.

They devote much of the day to the Word of God, through lectio divina and in liturgical prayer (the Divine Office). This life of prayer bears fruit in hospitality, providing an opportunity for people to  be in an atmosphere where they can find God.

Abbey of St. Walburga and the Benedictine nuns

All of their daily work, whether in direct service to others or undertaken for the financial support of community, is also offered to the glory of God.

History of the Abbey of St. Walburga

Patroness, St.Walburga (710-779) herself participated in the missionary thrust that carried Benedictine monasticism from the flourishing monasteries of Anglo-Saxon England to the continent.

Her relics and memory are preserved today at the Abbey of St. Walburg in Eichstätt, Bavaria, which was founded in 1035 to care for her shrine.

In 1935, three sisters were sent from Eichstätt to a then-remote farm in Boulder, Colorado.

Times were troubled in Germany. Hitler’s rise to power cast the shadow of threat over all religious foundations. Ironically, the Abbey of St. Walburg was itself thriving to such an extent that it could no longer house its growing population of nuns.

Abbey of St. Walburga and the Benedictine nuns

For both reasons, Abbess Benedicta von Spiegel chose to make several foundations in the English-speaking world: one in Minster, England, one in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, one in Canyon City, Colorado, and one in Boulder.

They would serve both as a potential refuge for the nuns of Eichstätt and an outlet for the burgeoning community at St. Walburg as it outgrew its buildings.

The first nuns built a strong foundation for the future by their hard work, their grinding poverty, and their unshakeable faith in God’s providence.

In 1986, Abbess Franziska Kloos, OSB, who, as abbess of the Abbey of St. Walburg in Eichstätt was still the superior of the Convent of St. Walburga in Boulder, granted the Boulder community its independence from the motherhouse.

By 1992, it was clear that they needed more workspace and larger living quarters in order to continue to accept new members. As they considered various options for expansion, they realized that thier Boulder location, by this time on a busy highway and surrounded by subdivisions, was not the right place to build a new monastery.

So, in 1997, after five years of planning, discussion, and preparation, the community relocated to thier present site in Virginia Dale, Colorado, on land donated to them by a generous Denver businessman and his wife.

On October 22, 1997, they sang the Te Deum, the Church’s great song of thanksgiving to God, for the first time in their new Abbey. The new Abbey Church and monastery were blessed by Most Rev. Charles Chaput, Archbishop of Denver, on November 7, 1999

Located in Virginia Dale, a very small town 45 minutes north of Fort Collins off of Hwy 287. On the west side of Hwy 287, approximately 35 miles north of Fort Collins, Colorado and approximately 30 miles south of Laramie, Wyoming.

From the south, a green highway sign just past Virginia Dale will alert you to the approaching left turn. Be aware that the turn appears suddenly at the bottom of the hill.

There is no public transportation to the Abbey. If traveling by air, fly to Denver International Airport. We recomment renting a car for the two-hour drive to the Abbey. Airport shuttle service is available to Fort Collins, but the Abbey is not able to provide pick-up service from any of the drop-off points.

Divine Office

  • 4:50 a.m. Vigils (apx. 1 hour)
  • 6:45 a.m. Lauds (apx. 30 minutes)
  • After Mass: Terce (apx. 15 minutes)
  • 11:45 a.m. Sext or Sext and None combined (apx. 15 minutes)
  • 5: 00 p.m. Vespers (apx. 45 minutes)
  • 7:30 p.m. Compline (apx. 30 minutes):
  • Compline is sometimes sung at 7:00 p.m. Please call ahead to check.

History of the Abbey

Patroness, St.Walburga (710-779) herself participated in the missionary thrust that carried Benedictine monasticism from the flourishing monasteries of Anglo-Saxon England to the continent. Her relics and memory are preserved today at the Abbey of St. Walburg in Eichstätt, Bavaria, which was founded in 1035 to care for her shrine.

In 1935, three sisters were sent from Eichstätt to a then-remote farm in Boulder, Colorado. Times were troubled in Germany. Hitler’s rise to power cast the shadow of threat over all religious foundations. Ironically, the Abbey of St. Walburg was itself thriving to such an extent that it could no longer house its growing population of nuns.

For both reasons, Abbess Benedicta von Spiegel chose to make several foundations in the English-speaking world: one in Minster, England, one in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, one in Canyon City, Colorado, and one in Boulder. They would serve both as a potential refuge for the nuns of Eichstätt and an outlet for the burgeoning community at St. Walburg as it outgrew its buildings.

The first nuns built a strong foundation for the future by their hard work, their grinding poverty, and their unshakeable faith in God’s providence.

In 1986, Abbess Franziska Kloos, OSB, who, as abbess of the Abbey of St. Walburg in Eichstätt was still the superior of the Convent of St. Walburga in Boulder, granted the Boulder community its independence from the motherhouse. We remain a member community of the Federation of Bavarian Monasteries of Nuns, with strong ties of gratitude and affection to our motherhouse, but we are now an autonomous house.
As the numbers continued to grow, however, we too began to outgrow our buildings. By 1992, it was clear that we needed more workspace and larger living quarters in order to continue to accept new members. As we considered various options for expansion, we realized that our Boulder location, by this time on a busy highway and surrounded by subdivisions, was not the right place to build a new monastery.

So, in 1997, after five years of planning, discussion, and preparation, our community relocated to our present site in Virginia Dale, Colorado, on land donated to us by a generous Denver businessman and his wife.

On October 22, 1997, we sang the Te Deum, the Church’s great song of thanksgiving to God, for the first time in our new Abbey. The new Abbey Church and monastery were blessed by Most Rev. Charles Chaput, Archbishop of Denver, on November 7, 1999

Posted in North America and United States