Dominican Monastery Of Our Lady Of The Rosary

Dominican Nuns, 543 Springfield Ave, Summit, New Jersey, Združene države Amerike

Website of the Sanctuary

+1 908 273 1228

Doors to the chapel are open from 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM daily. The gift shop is usually open from 9:30-4:00.

The Perpetual Rosary is a particular membership within the Confraternity of the Most Holy Rosary. It is a definite participation in the Perpetual Prayer of the Rosary by the cloistered Dominican Nuns who have assumed this obligation.

You are invited to join the Nuns in keeping company with Our Lady Of The Rosary one hour each month while pondering the mysteries of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus.  This may be in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament or at home.

What is a Dominican Nun of Our Lady Of The Rosary?

What is a Dominican Nun? Like all contemplatives, their specific mission is unceasing prayer for the entire Church, a spiritual service in the form of praise, adoration, intercession, expiation and thanksgiving. By profession, they are wholly consecrated to the Church and are called to the task of spreading the Kingdom of God in the world, using only the means of prayer and penance, which are endowed with a marvellous hidden apostolic fruitfulness. See more Catholic Shrines and pilgrimages in North America

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They hold in their hearts the sufferings and anguish of all, and are a sign to believers and unbelievers alike of the existence and presence of God, affirming the transcendent values of the life to come. By their hidden life they proclaim prophetically that in Christ alone is true happiness to be found, here by grace and afterwards in glory.

Contemplative activity at the service of the Church is the definite pattern set by St. Dominic for the Nuns of the Order, for he founded them ten years before the Brethren to offer their prayers and penances for all “preachers of the word.”

From the very beginning of the Order, St. Dominic associated them with “the holy preaching,” through a life of contemplation, liturgical prayer, work, and sacrifice. He founded the nuns before the friars, knowing that the success of his preaching depended upon and was linked intimately with the intercession of his daughters.

Their life is apostolic and universal in scope, consisting, according to the Dominican ideal, in giving to others the fruits of contemplation: “contemplata aliis tradere.” Yet, the ultimate end of the Dominican contemplative nun is to live by God alone and for God alone. While it embraces their personal sanctification and the apostolate, nevertheless transcends them both. It is transformation into Christ through Love.

  • Plane: Flying into the Newark Airport is the best option. Location is 20 minutes from the airport.
  • Train: Amtrak comes into Penn Station in Newark. If coming from the North exit Penn Station in NYC and take the light rail to Summit.
  • Summit is on the Gladstone-Peapack Line.
  • Lauds – 5:55 AM (Sun. 6:05 AM)
  • Terce is after Mass. There is a 10 minute period of Thanksgiving first.
  • Sext – 11:50 AM
  • Readings & None – 3:00 PM
  • Rosary & Vespers – 5:20 PM
  • Compline (open to the public on Wednesday and Thursday only) – 8:40 PM

The nearly 400 year-old copy of the Shroud of Turin which has been the possession of the Dominican Nuns of the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary is now on display for public veneration in the monastery chapel.

This Shroud replica was commissioned by the Most Serene Infanta, Maria Maddalena of Austria, Grand Duchess of Tuscany, wife of Cosimo de’ Medici in April, 1624. To give the copy greater value it was placed for a time on the Shroud of Turin.

What makes this replica treasured and venerated to this day is the fact that it came into physical contact with the Holy Shroud of Turin. When it was removed it was found that the wound in the side, as it is seen on the Holy Shroud had become damp as though with blood, and that this effusion had stained the copy. In 1987, scientists from the STURP team affirmed that the stain was indeed that of human blood and of the same blood type as on the Holy Shroud.

It was the Duchess Maria Magdalena, a close friend of the Nuns of St. Catherine’s Monastery, Rome who presented this copy to the monastery. This copy was venerated by the Nuns for nearly 300 years.

In gratitude for the generous help of the fledging Monastery in Summit, New Jersey after World War I, the Dominican Nuns of St. Catherine’s Monastery gave it to the Summit Dominican Nuns on April 6, 1924.

Between June 1924 and March 1926 a great deal of research took place toward re-affirming the relic’s authenticity. The Procurator General of the Order of Preachers, Rev. Father Philip Caterini, O.P. was able to re-establish authenticity of the copy by documents found in the State Archives at Turin. Bishop John O’Connor, Bishop of Newark authorized its public veneration and the Holy Father granted rich indulgences for its veneration.

For many years the Shroud copy has been kept within the enclosure and available for private viewing only.

The Shroud copy is now on permanent display in the public chapel of the Dominican Nuns. The chapel is open from 6:00 AM to 7:00 PM daily.

What is a Dominican Nun? Like all contemplatives, our specific mission is unceasing prayer for the entire Church, a spiritual service in the form of praise, adoration, intercession, expiation and thanksgiving. By profession, we are wholly consecrated to the Church and are called to the task of spreading the Kingdom of God in the world, using only the means of prayer and penance, which are endowed with a marvelous hidden apostolic fruitfulness. We hold in our hearts the sufferings and anguish of all, and are a sign to believers and unbelievers alike of the existence and presence of God, affirming the transcendent values of the life to come. By our hidden life we proclaim prophetically that in Christ alone is true happiness to be found, here by grace and afterwards in glory.

Contemplative activity at the service of the Church is the definite pattern set by St. Dominic for the Nuns of the Order, for he founded them ten years before the Brethren to offer their prayers and penances for all “preachers of the word.” From the very beginning of the Order, St. Dominic associated us with “the holy preaching,” through a life of contemplation, liturgical prayer, work, and sacrifice. He founded the nuns before the friars, knowing that the success of his preaching depended upon and was linked intimately with the intercession of his daughters.

Our life is apostolic and universal in scope, consisting, according to the Dominican ideal, in giving to others the fruits of contemplation: “contemplata aliis tradere.” Yet, the ultimate end of the Dominican contemplative nun is to live by God alone and for God alone. While it embraces our personal sanctification and the apostolate, nevertheless transcends them both. It is transformation into Christ through Love.

Beginnings

St. Dominic de Guzman (1170- 1221) gathers together a group of women converts from the Albigensian heresy at Prouilhe, France, in 1206. Forming them into a community of prayer and penance, he associated them with the holy preaching of his brethren, the friars of the Order of Preachers, founded in 1216. Under Dominic’s fatherly care, monasteries were founded in San Sisto, Rome, and Bologna, and spread throughout Europe.

For His Honor and Glory

In 1880 in Calais, France, Fr. Damien-Marie Saintourens, O.P., and Mother Rose of Saint Mary Werhle, O.P., found a community of Dominican cloistered contemplative sisters whose special apostolate is the Perpetual Rosary. While keeping the monastic observances, the sisters were also to be “Mary’s Guard of Honor, ” contemplating the mysteries of salvation presented in the Rosary.

The first American Perpetual Rosary monastery was established at the Blue Chapel, Union City, NJ, in 1891. In 1919, fifteen sisters led by Mother Mary Imelda Gauthier, O.P., left there to found the Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary in Summit, NJ. Two more foundations issued from this monastery: North Guilford, CT (Our Lady of Grace Monastery) in 1947, and Cainta, Philippines (Monastery of Our Lady of the Rosary) in 1977.

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