Aglona Basilica of the Assumption in Latvia

Aglona Basilica, Aglona, Aglona Parish, Latvia

Website of the Sanctuary

+371 29188740

Every day from 6.30 am to 8.00 pm

Basilica of the Assumption in Aglona, Latvia is one of the most important Catholic spiritual centers in Latvia. The basilica a is the major Roman Catholic shrine of Latvia. Pilgrims come to Aglona on August 15 each year to celebrate the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary into Heaven.

Aglona Basilica of the Assumption in Latvia

Holy Mass times:

Working days

  • 7:00
  • 12:00
  • 19:00

Sundays and holidays

  • 10:00
  • 12:00
  • 19:00

Aglona Basilica

Aglona Basilica, built in the late Baroque style, boasts two approximately 60-meter-high towers. Inside the church, there are groin vaults, arcs and columns featuring rich Rococo style adornments. The church’s furbishing is from the 18th century and its bye-altars have been built in the early 19th century.

Pilgrims come to Aglona every year on August 15 to celebrate the day of the Assumption of the Virgin Mary into Heaven. It is one of the most well-known sacred sites in the world. Groined vaults, arches and columns splendidly decorated in rococo style can be found inside. The Dominican order founded a monastery and built the first wooden church in Aglona in the 17th century. When in 1699 the wooden church burned down, the stone building of a monastery and the present temple was built on its place in 1768 – 1780. The interior finish of the church was created in the 18th – 19th century, but the pulpit and the organ – at the close of the 18th century.

Aglona Basilica of the Assumption in Latvia

The quantity of pilgrims increased even more, then Aglona was called the Catholic centre of Latvia. In 1980 the Pope gave Aglona church the title of the “minor basilica” (“basilica minoris”). It is the only one in Latvia. The Pope of Rome John Paul II arrived to Aglona as a pilgrim on September 9, 1993. In 1995 the parliament of the Republic of Latvia passed the law “The Sacred Site of National Importance in Aglona”.

Our Lady of Aglona

A collection of paintings, sculptures and other artwork kept in the church includes a 17th century icon, “Our Miraculous Lady of Aglona”, which is only unveiled to the public during religious celebrations. The icon is believed to have miraculous powers of healing.

There are many legends about miracles of Aglona. One of them has that peasant Kristaps Mateisāns from Spīku village was once taking his child to Aglona for christening. A fierce storm blew up as he was rowing his boat across Lake Cirisu and it rocked violently in the choppy waters. The peasant, struggling to navigate his boat, did not notice his child overboard. When he realized the tragedy, he cried out to the Lady of Aglona, and miraculously, his child emerged from the water near the shore, rescued by people on the lakeside.

Aglona Basilica of the Assumption in Latvia

Sacred spring

Divine healing properties are attributed to the water running from a spring on the shore of Lake Egle near the basilica.

Source and photos:

Our Lady of Aglona

A collection of paintings, sculptures and other artwork kept in the church includes a 17th century icon, “Our Miraculous Lady of Aglona”, which is only unveiled to the public during religious celebrations. The icon is believed to have miraculous powers of healing.

Aglona Basilica, built in the late Baroque style, boasts two approximately 60-meter-high towers. Inside the church, there are groin vaults, arcs and columns featuring rich Rococo style adornments. The church’s furbishing is from the 18th century and its bye-altars have been built in the early 19th century.

Groined vaults, arches and columns splendidly decorated in rococo style can be found inside. The Dominican order founded a monastery and built the first wooden church in Aglona in the 17th century. When in 1699 the wooden church burned down, the stone building of a monastery and the present temple was built on its place in 1768 – 1780. The interior finish of the church was created in the 18th – 19th century, but the pulpit and the organ – at the close of the 18th century.

Posted in Europe and Latvia