Basilica of St Anthony of Padua with Prayer to St Anthony

The Basilica of St. Anthony, Piazza del Santo, 11, Padova, Italija

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Every day: 6.20 – 18.45 (Summer 19.45)

The Basilica of St Anthony of Padua

The actual Basilica of St Anthony of Padua is largely the result of three different reconstructions, which took place over a period of about 70 years: 1238-1310. 

In St. Anthony’s time there was the little church Santa Maria Mater Domini, which was then integrated into the Basilica and is now the Chapel of the Black Madonna. Next to this, in 1229, the Friary sprang up, which was probably founded by St. Anthony himself.

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St. Anthony died in 1231 in Arcella, in the north of the city where a Clarisse monastery then stood, his body – according his own wishes – was transported and buried in the little church Santa Maria Mater Domini. 

The construction of the first nucleus of the Basilica of St Anthony of Padua, a Franciscan church with only a single nave and a short transept, began in 1238; two lateral naves were added and it was eventually transformed into the amazing structure that we admire today.

Basilica of St Anthony of Padua Prayer to St Anthony

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Guide to a spiritual experience in the The Basilica of St Anthony of Padua. How to make the most of a visit to the Basilica? How to best experience a spiritual pilgrimage to the Basilica?

The pilgrimage has some characteristic elements:

  • request for help (especially in difficult moments);
  • thanks for having obtained it;
  • making peace with God and the friars through the sacrament of penance/reconciliation
  • meeting Christ in the Eucharist.

The following is a guide to the spiritual experience of a pilgrimage to the Basilica of St Anthony of Padua.

This can be used to prepare yourself for a visit to the The Basilica of St Anthony of Padua or to guide a celebration in your community.

It is divided into three parts:

  • Meeting St. Anthony: a confidential listener.
  • Meeting the mercy of God: celebrating reconciliation
  • Meeting Christ the Redeemer: celebrating the Eucharist

Basilica of St Anthony of Padua Prayer to St Anthony

The chapel of the tomb of St Anthony of Padua

The Saint’s tomb has been called the “Ark” from the very beginning. The Saint’s tomb is in the altar in this chapel, at head height. Originally it was located (from 1231 to 1263) in the little chapel of St. Maria Mater Domini (today the Chapel of the Black Madonna) and from 1263 to 1310 in the centre of the Basilica, in the Presbytery, under the present conical cupola. The location of the tomb from 1310 to 1350 is uncertain, however, it might have been in its current position. It has remained in this chapel from 1350.

Until the beginning of the sixteenth century, the style which has decorated the chapel has always been Gothic, with frescoes by Stefano da Ferrara, the same artist who painted the Virgin of the Pillar.

The current decoration was completed in the sixteenth century and is quite harmonious from an architectural and sculptural point of view. It has been attributed to Tullio Lombardo.

Basilica of St Anthony of Padua Prayer to St Anthony

The altar is rather invasive, but the artist Tiziano Aspetti (who created it at the end of the sixteenth century) was conditioned by the height of the preceding altar which was difficult to modify. The statues on the altar (St. Anthony between St. Bonaventure and St. Louis of Anjou) are by the same artist, while other bronze workers made the angels, the small gate and the two small branched candlesticks.

The taller ones supported by marble angels are sixteenth century creations by Filippo Parodi. High reliefs on the walls behind the tomb. – with a bit respect and good manners, it is possible to combine, for whoever may be interested, a pause for prayer and reflection at the Saint’s tomb with brief glance at the nine high reliefs found in the chapel.

The Treasury chapel

This chapel, built in 1691, a Baroque work by Parodi, one of Bernini’s pupils occupies a distinct space in the The Basilica of Saint Anthony, without ruining its Gothic coherence. The architecture transforms into triumph before our very eyes, beginning with the balustrade and six marble statues (also by Parodi).

Behind the balustrade, there is the walkway that allows visitors to admire the “treasure” of the The Basilica of Saint Anthony, hence the name of the Chapel.

The reliquaries are collected in three distinct niches and accompanied below by pairs of angels The entire scene is crowned by celebrating angels (in stucco work by Pietro Roncaioli da Lugano) which lead up to the glory of St. Anthony (in marble, by Parodi).

There are further decorations in the drum of the cupola (by Roncaioli) and in the canopy (from the beginning of the last century).

Records of the Saint (in front of the balustrade). Before climbing up to the niches, we can look at objects connected with the Saint, which have been set in this area and on the walls facing the balustrade.

In January 1981, on the occasion of the 750th anniversary of the death of Saint Anthony, and with the intention of specifying the exact state of St. Anthony’s mortal remains, St. Anthony’s tomb was opened for the second time in history for the “religious pontifical commission” and a “scientific/technical commission” inside was found:

  • a large pinewood box, wrapped in four linen sheets and, over these, two highly decorated and embroidered drapes;
  • inside the large box, a second smaller box (of pine) with two different-sized compartments and a cord with three seals running along the length of the lid; inside three bundles wrapped in crimson red silk and finely embroidered (probably belonging to a cope) and with a precious appliqué trim and each labelled with a parchment indicating the contents which were:
  • the entire skeleton, apart from the jaw, left forearm and other minor parts;
  • other remains, mostly reduced to dust;
  • the tunic, made from ash-coloured wool.

Outside the large box and within the altar which housed it there was:

  • a plaque with the date of the Saint’s death, his canonisation and of the transfer of his mortal remains from the little church of Santa Maria Mater Domini to the new Basilica (8 April 1263)
  • Lots of little rings (10 white and 50 black) from a necklace or rosary.

Giuliano da Firenze, Reliquary of St. Anthony’s tongue, detail, 1436To understand all this, we need to think back to the year 1263.

The second phase of construction of the Basilica was completed, and on the occasion of the “general chapter” which gathered Franciscans together in Padua with the general secretary of the Order of St. Bonaventure, the tomb of the Saint was transferred from the little church of Santa Maria Mater Domini to the centre of the Basilica, under the present cone-shaped cupola (in front of the Presbytery).

On that occasion the coffin containing the Saint’s remains was opened for the first time, above all to remove some relics to offer for the devotion of the faithful in other churches.

It was a great surprise to see his tongue incorrupt. It was then that St. Bonaventure, with his heart full of admiration, prayed aloud: O blessed tongue, you have always praised the Lord and led others to praise him! Now we can clearly see how great indeed have been your merits before God.

It was then decided to separately conserve the Saint’s tongue, jaw, left forearm and a few other minor relics. The rest was wrapped up in the crimson red bundles mentioned above, and placed in a smaller box which, in turn was placed in a larger box.

The recent recognition of 1981 provided the opportunity to make an examination of the historical, technical, artistic, anthropological and medical character of all the material discovered.

The Saint’s skeleton was accordingly reconstructed and placed on a small cushion in a crystal case, within which were placed two glass caskets containing the other remains.

The crystal case was then locked away in an oak casket and placed back into the tomb. In the Treasury Chapel there is: the Saint’s tunic, the two wooden boxes, the cord and two seals, the three crimson red cloths reconstructed as a cope, the two large decorated drapes, the plaque, some small coins and the rings. All of which can be devoutly observed.

Up the left flight of steps there are three niches which contain relics of St. Anthony and other Saints, and above, gifts donated in recognition or as signs of devotion by wealthy pilgrims who have visited the Patron Saint of Padua.

We must instead focus on the most prestigious relics of St. Anthony which are in the central niche. The Saint’s tongue (in the centre). Do not expect it to be a tongue which is bright red in colour.

It is still however an inexplicable fact, given that it is a very fragile part of the body that is usually among the first parts to disintegrate after death. More than 770 years have passed since St. Anthony died and this tongue is a perennial miracle, unique in history and full of religious significance, a seal marking the work of re-evangelisation of society carried out by the Saint.

A gilded silver masterpiece, a work by Giuliano da Firenze (1434-36) proudly contains the relic of the jaw (above). More precisely, the lower jaw, contained in a case shaped like a bust, with a halo and crystal glass where the face should be.

It was commissioned in 1349 by Cardinal Guy de Boulogne-sur-Mer, who experienced one of the Saint’s miracles: He brought it to Padua the following year, to solemnly organise the placing of the jaw into this reliquary.

The cartilage of the larynx . This is still incorrupt. These are the parts of the body used in phonation, that is to say, in speech, and thus attracted attention straightaway, although not considered inexplicable like the tongue during the recent recognition in 1981. It was still decided to place it with the Saint’s tongue. The reliquary is the work of Carlo Balljana from Treviso.

Exiting the Chapel of Treasure, on the right there are the following chapels: the Polish Chapel or Chapel of St. Stanislaus (+ 1079), priest and martyr and patron Saint of Poland, then the Austro-Hungarian Chapel or Chapel of St. Leopold (1075-1136), margrave and Patron Saint of Austria; then the Chapel of St. Francis; and finally the Chapel of St. Joseph.

The chapel of the black Madonna

Further ahead, on the right-hand side, there is the Chapel of the Black Virgin. Here we find ourselves in what remains of the early church of St. Maria Mater Domini (end of XII-beginning XIII) contained within Basilica.

St. Anthony certainly prayed here and his dying wish was that he be buried here. His remains stayed here until 1263.

The statue of the Black Madonna which dominated the altar was completed in 1396 by Rainaldino di Puy-l’Evéque, a Gascon artist. Paduans have called it the “Black Madonna” because of her dark complexion, the name also expresses their loving relationship with her.

Basilica of St Anthony of Padua Prayer to St Anthony

At the side of the chapel there is the Chapel of Blessed Luca Belludi, dedicated also to St. Philip and St. James the Younger, apostles of St. Anthony. It was added to the Basilica of Saint Anthony at the end of the fourteenth century, and named after Blessed Luke, St. Anthony’s companion and successor, because his tomb is in the altar.

Paduan students often come here, placing their trust in the blessed one’s intercession for the difficult task of preparing for their exams.

The chapel was from almost the beginning however dedicated also to St. Philip and St. James The frescoes by the Florentine Giusto de’ Menabuoi are very interesting, and originate from the second half of the fourteenth century (1382).

Ruined by the humidity, they have recently been restored and brought back to their former splendour, allowing us to appreciate their considerable artistic level.

The raised sarcophagus is empty these days. This altar/tomb dates from the thirteenth century and tradition has it that from 1263 to 1310 it was the tomb of St. Anthony, when it was located in the Presbytery of the Basilica, under the conical cupola.

Prayers to St. Anthony

Brief – “Tredicina”

1. O glorious St. Anthony, you who have received from God the power to raise the dead, awaken my soul from its apathy and obtain for me a fervent and holy life. Glory be to the Father, etc.

2. O wise St. Anthony, you who were light for the Holy Church as well as for the entire world through your teaching, enlighten my soul and open it for divine truth. Glory be to the Father, etc.

3. O pious Saint, always ready to help those devoted to you, help me and my family in our present needs. Glory be to the Father, etc.

4. O generous Saint, you who by accepting divine inspiration have consecrated your life to the service of God, grant that I may hear the voice of the Lord with submissiveness. Glory be to the Father, etc.

5. O St. Anthony, true lily of purity, do not permit that my soul be stained by sin but obtain for me purity of heart from our Lord. Glory be to the Father, etc.

6. O dear Saint, through whose intercession so many sick people have found health, help my soul to heal from sin and evil inclinations. Glory be to the Father, etc.

7. O St. Anthony, you who have given yourself to save your brothers, lead me through the sea of life and give me your help in order that I may reach the safe harbour of eternal salvation. Glory be to the Father, etc.

8. O compassionate St. Anthony, you who have freed so many condemned prisoners during your life, obtain for me the grace that I be freed from the bonds of sin and live in the grace of God for all eternity. Glory be to the Father, etc..

9. O holy Thaumaturge, you who have had the gift of reuniting to the body limbs that have been cut off, grant that I may never be separated from the love of God, and the unity of the Church. Glory be to the Father, etc.

10. O Saint Anthony, you who have always helped to find lost objects, grant that I may never lose God’s friendship, but that I may conserve it faithfully throughout my life. Glory be to the Father, etc.

11. O patron of the poor, you who listen to those who turn to you, receive my prayer and present it to God that He might grant me His assistance. Glory be to the Father, etc.

12. O St. Anthony, you who were the untiring apostle of the word of God, grant that I may bear witness to my faith with words and deeds. Glory be to the Father, etc.

13. O most beloved St. Anthony, you who have your blessed tomb in Padua, look upon my needs, may your miraculous tongue speak to God for me, that my prayers may be heard. Glory be to the Father, etc.

Pray for us St. Anthony. Make us worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray.

Almighty and Eternal God, you who in St. Anthony of Padua have given to Your people an illustrious preacher of the Gospel and a patron of the poor and the suffering, grant to us, through your intercession, to follow your teaching on Christian life and to experience, in trials, the help of your mercy. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

If then you ask for miracles (translation of the “Si quaeris”)

If then you ask for miracles,
Death, error and all calamities,
Leprosy and demons fly,
And health succeeds infirmities.

The sea obeys and fetters break,
And lifeless limbs you do restore;
While treasures lost are found again,
When young and old your aid implore.

All dangers vanish at your prayer,
And direst need does quickly flee;
Let those who know your power proclaim,
Let Paduans say: these are of thee.

To Father, Son, may glory be
And Holy Spirit, eternally.

Pray for us St. Anthony.
Make us worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray.

Lord God, may the commemoration of St. Anthony, Doctor of the Church, be a source of joy to your people, so that, strengthened by his spiritual assistance, they may become worthy of the eternal happiness of your kingdom. Through Christ our Lord, Amen.

O Blessed Tongue (by St. Bonaventure, 1263)

O blessed tongue, you who have always praised the Lord and made others praise Him, now it is clearly evident how much merit you have before the Lord!

Invocation (by St. Bonaventure)

Remember, O dear St. Anthony, that you have always helped and consoled whoever had recourse in you in his necessities.

Encouraged by the great confidence and by the certainty of not praying in vain, I too turn to you, who are so rich in merits before the Lord. Do not refuse my prayer but grant that, through your intercession, it will reach the throne of God.

Come to my aid in my present distress and necessity, and obtain for me the grace that I ardently implore, if it is for the good of my soul. Bless my work and keep sicknesses and dangers of soul and body far from my family. Grant that in time of suffering and trial I may remain strong in faith and in the love of God. Amen.

Prayer for the family

Dear St. Anthony, we turn to you to ask your protection for our family. Called by God, you left your house to consecrate your life to good works for your neighbour, and have come to the aid of countless families, even with wondrous deeds, to bring peace and serenity everywhere.

Our dear patron, intervene in our favour: obtain for us health of body and spirit from God, grant that we may share in a true communion which will enable us to open ourselves to love for our neighbour; grant that our family be, like the Holy Family of Nazareth, a small house of God and that every family in the world may become a shrine to life and love. Amen.

Prayer for the Protection of Children

O Saint Anthony, we turn to you to place that which we hold most precious and dear under your protection: our children.

While you were immersed in prayer, the Baby Jesus appeared to you. While you were leaving this world you were comforted by the vision of our Lord, and little children spread the news of your blessed death: look upon these children who we place in your care; help them to grow, as Jesus grew, in age, knowledge and grace.

Help them to preserve their innocence and their simplicity of heart; grant that they may always have the attentive affection and wise guidance of their parents. Watch over them that as they grow in years they may reach full maturity and, as Christians, be examples of perfect faith.

O Saint Anthony, our patron, be close to all children and comfort us too with your continuous protection. Amen.

Pilgrim’s prayer at the Tomb of St. Anthony

Dear St. Anthony, look kindly upon me as I stand at your blessed tomb.

In my many needs, I have come here to pray to you, confident that in your compassionate goodness you will answer me. Present my petition to God. Through your intercession, may He grant my particular request…

My faith is weak; yours was firm and constant. Through your preaching you brought to life the faith of others; strengthen my commitment to the Good News of our Lord Jesus Christ. Make me a faithful member of His people now so that I may praise the Father later in heaven.

Glorious St. Anthony, come to my aid; protect me from all spiritual and bodily harm, and encourage me in my moments of trial and suffering. Bless my family and work. Be generous and kind toward your petitioners at your tomb and to those scattered throughout the world. Amen.

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The chapel of the tomb of Saint Anthony

The Saint’s tomb has been called the “Ark” from the very beginning. The Saint’s tomb is in the altar in this chapel, at head height. Originally it was located (from 1231 to 1263) in the little chapel of St. Maria Mater Domini (today the Chapel of the Black Madonna) and from 1263 to 1310 in the centre of the Basilica, in the Presbytery, under the present conical cupola. The location of the tomb from 1310 to 1350 is uncertain, however, it might have been in its current position. It has remained in this chapel from 1350.

Until the beginning of the sixteenth century, the style which has decorated the chapel has always been Gothic, with frescoes by Stefano da Ferrara, the same artist who painted the Virgin of the Pillar.
The current decoration was completed in the sixteenth century and is quite harmonious from an architectural and sculptural point of view. It has been attributed to Tullio Lombardo.

The altar is rather invasive, but the artist Tiziano Aspetti (who created it at the end of the sixteenth century) was conditioned by the height of the preceding altar which was difficult to modify. The statues on the altar (St. Anthony between St. Bonaventure and St. Louis of Anjou) are by the same artist, while other bronze workers made the angels, the small gate and the two small branched candlesticks.

The taller ones supported by marble angels are sixteenth century creations by Filippo Parodi. High reliefs on the walls behind the tomb. – with a bit respect and good manners, it is possible to combine, for whoever may be interested, a pause for prayer and reflection at the Saint’s tomb with brief glance at the nine high reliefs found in the chapel.
1. St. Anthony receiving the Franciscan habit. A work by Antonio Minello (1517).

2. The jealous husband, whose wife, beaten out of jealousy, is healed by the Saint. The work, begun by Giovanni Rubino (known as il Dentone), was completed by Silvio Cosini (1536).

3. The young man resurrected by the Saint. The Saint, miraculously transported to Portugal, resurrects a young man so that he can reveal his assassin in order to exonerate Anthony’s father, in whose garden the young man’s body was hidden. Begun by Danese Cattaneo, it was completed by Girolamo Campagna (1573).

4. The resurrected young girl. A young girl, having drowned is resuscitated by the Saint, who does not appear in this representation, even if you can see his Basilica above. The work is by Jacopo Sansovino (1563). It is a well-balanced and powerful representation.

5. The resuscitated child. The child is Anthony’s nephew. This is a work by Antonio Minello, with retouches by Sansovino (1536).

6. The heart of the deceased usurer is not found where it should be, but in his coffer, as the Saint had declared. This is by Tullio Lombardo (1525).

7. St. Anthony reattaches the foot of a young man, who out of desperation had cut it off after kicking his mother. The work of Tullio Lombardo (1504).

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8. The glass which remains intact, having been thrown to the ground as a challenge by someone who did not believe in the preaching or wonders worked by St. Anthony. Begun by Giovanni Maria Mosca, it was completed by Paolo Stella (1529).

9. St. Anthony makes a newborn baby speak, to attest to the honesty of his mother, unjustly suspected by her jealous husband. The work of Antonio Lombardo (1505), Tullio’s brother.

Guide to a spiritual experience in the The Basilica of Saint Anthony.
How to make the most of a visit to the Basilica?
How to best experience a spiritual pilgrimage to the Basilica?

The pilgrimage has some characteristic elements:

  • request for help (especially in difficult moments);
  • thanks for having obtained it;
  • making peace with God and the friars through the sacrament of penance/reconciliation
  • meeting Christ in the Eucharist.

The following is a guide to the spiritual experience of a pilgrimage to the Basilica of Saint Anthony. These are notes to facilitate a triple meeting: with St. Anthony, with the mercy of God and with Jesus Christ the Redeemer. This can be used to prepare yourself for a visit to the The Basilica of Saint Anthony or to guide a celebration in your community.

It is divided into three parts:

  • Meeting St. Anthony: a confidential listener.
  • Meeting the mercy of God: celebrating reconciliation
  • Meeting Christ the Redeemer: celebrating the Eucharist

The Treasury chapel

This chapel, built in 1691, a Baroque work by Parodi, one of Bernini’s pupils occupies a distinct space in the The Basilica of Saint Anthony, without ruining its Gothic coherence. The architecture transforms into triumph before our very eyes, beginning with the balustrade and six marble statues (also by Parodi).

Behind the balustrade, there is the walkway that allows visitors to admire the “treasure” of the The Basilica of Saint Anthony, hence the name of the Chapel. The reliquaries are collected in three distinct niches and accompanied below by pairs of angels The entire scene is crowned by celebrating angels (in stucco work by Pietro Roncaioli da Lugano) which lead up to the glory of St. Anthony (in marble, by Parodi). There are further decorations in the drum of the cupola (by Roncaioli) and in the canopy (from the beginning of the last century).

Records of the Saint (in front of the balustrade). Before climbing up to the niches, we can look at objects connected with the Saint, which have been set in this area and on the walls facing the balustrade. In January 1981, on the occasion of the 750th anniversary of the death of Saint Anthony, and with the intention of specifying the exact state of St. Anthony’s mortal remains, St. Anthony’s tomb was opened for the second time in history for the “religious pontifical commission” and a “scientific/technical commission”. (See the recognition pages) Inside was found:

  • a large pinewood box, wrapped in four linen sheets and, over these, two highly decorated and embroidered drapes;
  • inside the large box, a second smaller box (of pine) with two different-sized compartments and a cord with three seals running along the length of the lid; inside three bundles wrapped in crimson red silk and finely embroidered (probably belonging to a cope) and with a precious appliqué trim and each labelled with a parchment indicating the contents which were:
  • the entire skeleton, apart from the jaw, left forearm and other minor parts;
  • other remains, mostly reduced to dust;
  • the tunic, made from ash-coloured wool.

outside the large box and within the altar which housed it there was:

  • a plaque with the date of the Saint’s death, his canonisation and of the transfer of his mortal remains from the little church of Santa Maria Mater Domini to the new Basilica (8 April 1263)
  • Lots of little rings (10 white and 50 black) from a necklace or rosary.

Giuliano da Firenze, Reliquary of St. Anthony’s tongue, detail, 1436To understand all this, we need to think back to the year 1263. The second phase of construction of the Basilica was completed, and on the occasion of the “general chapter” which gathered Franciscans together in Padua with the general secretary of the Order of St. Bonaventure, the tomb of the Saint was transferred from the little church of Santa Maria Mater Domini to the centre of the Basilica, under the present cone-shaped cupola (in front of the Presbytery).

On that occasion the coffin containing the Saint’s remains was opened for the first time, above all to remove some relics to offer for the devotion of the faithful in other churches.
It was a great surprise to see his tongue incorrupt. It was then that St. Bonaventure, with his heart full of admiration, prayed aloud: O blessed tongue, you have always praised the Lord and led others to praise him! Now we can clearly see how great indeed have been your merits before God.

It was then decided to separately conserve the Saint’s tongue, jaw, left forearm and a few other minor relics. The rest was wrapped up in the crimson red bundles mentioned above, and placed in a smaller box which, in turn was placed in a larger box.

The recent recognition of 1981 provided the opportunity to make an examination of the historical, technical, artistic, anthropological and medical character of all the material discovered. The Saint’s skeleton was accordingly reconstructed and placed on a small cushion in a crystal case, within which were placed two glass caskets containing the other remains. The crystal case was then locked away in an oak casket and placed back into the tomb. In the Treasury Chapel there is: the Saint’s tunic, the two wooden boxes, the cord and two seals, the three crimson red cloths reconstructed as a cope, the two large decorated drapes, the plaque, some small coins and the rings. All of which can be devoutly observed.

Up the left flight of steps there are three niches which contain relics of St. Anthony and other Saints, and above, gifts donated in recognition or as signs of devotion by wealthy pilgrims who have visited the Patron Saint of Padua. We must instead focus on the most prestigious relics of St. Anthony which are in the central niche. The Saint’s tongue (in the centre). Do not expect it to be a tongue which is bright red in colour. It is still however an inexplicable fact, given that it is a very fragile part of the body that is usually among the first parts to disintegrate after death. More than 770 years have passed since St. Anthony died and this tongue is a perennial miracle, unique in history and full of religious significance, a seal marking the work of re-evangelisation of society carried out by the Saint.

A gilded silver masterpiece, a work by Giuliano da Firenze (1434-36) proudly contains the relic of the jaw (above). More precisely, the lower jaw, contained in a case shaped like a bust, with a halo and crystal glass where the face should be. It was commissioned in 1349 by Cardinal Guy de Boulogne-sur-Mer, who experienced one of the Saint’s miracles: He brought it to Padua the following year, to solemnly organise the placing of the jaw into this reliquary. The cartilage of the larynx (below). This is still incorrupt. These are the parts of the body used in phonation, that is to say, in speech, and thus attracted attention straightaway, although not considered inexplicable like the tongue during the recent recognition in 1981. It was still decided to place it with the Saint’s tongue. The reliquary is the work of Carlo Balljana from Treviso.

Exiting the Chapel of Treasure, on the right there are the following chapels: the Polish Chapel or Chapel of St. Stanislaus (+ 1079), priest and martyr and patron Saint of Poland, then the Austro-Hungarian Chapel or Chapel of St. Leopold (1075-1136), margrave and Patron Saint of Austria; then the Chapel of St. Francis; and finally the Chapel of St. Joseph.

The chapel of the black Madonna

Rinaldino di Puy Darlieux, 1396Further ahead, on the right-hand side, there is the Chapel of the Black Virgin. Here we find ourselves in what remains of the early church of St. Maria Mater Domini (end of XII-beginning XIII) contained within Basilica. St. Anthony certainly prayed here and his dying wish was that he be buried here. His remains stayed here until 1263.

The statue of the Black Madonna which dominated the altar was completed in 1396 by Rainaldino di Puy-l’Evéque, a Gascon artist. Paduans have called it the “Black Madonna” because of her dark complexion, the name also expresses their loving relationship with her. At the side of the chapel there is the Chapel of Blessed Luca Belludi, dedicated also to St. Philip and St. James the Younger, apostles of St. Anthony. It was added to the Basilica of Saint Anthony at the end of the fourteenth century, and named after Blessed Luke, St. Anthony’s companion and successor, because his tomb is in the altar. Paduan students often come here, placing their trust in the blessed one’s intercession for the difficult task of preparing for their exams.

The chapel was from almost the beginning however dedicated also to St. Philip and St. James The frescoes by the Florentine Giusto de’ Menabuoi are very interesting, and originate from the second half of the fourteenth century (1382). Ruined by the humidity, they have recently been restored and brought back to their former splendour, allowing us to appreciate their considerable artistic level.

The raised sarcophagus is empty these days. This altar/tomb dates from the thirteenth century and tradition has it that from 1263 to 1310 it was the tomb of St. Anthony, when it was located in the Presbytery of the Basilica, under the conical cupola.

Prayers to St. Anthony

Brief – “Tredicina”

1. O glorious St. Anthony, you who have received from God the power to raise the dead, awaken my soul from its apathy and obtain for me a fervent and holy life. Glory be to the Father, etc.

2. O wise St. Anthony, you who were light for the Holy Church as well as for the entire world through your teaching, enlighten my soul and open it for divine truth. Glory be to the Father, etc.

3. O pious Saint, always ready to help those devoted to you, help me and my family in our present needs. Glory be to the Father, etc.

4. O generous Saint, you who by accepting divine inspiration have consecrated your life to the service of God, grant that I may hear the voice of the Lord with submissiveness. Glory be to the Father, etc.

5. O St. Anthony, true lily of purity, do not permit that my soul be stained by sin but obtain for me purity of heart from our Lord. Glory be to the Father, etc.

6. O dear Saint, through whose intercession so many sick people have found health, help my soul to heal from sin and evil inclinations. Glory be to the Father, etc.

7. O St. Anthony, you who have given yourself to save your brothers, lead me through the sea of life and give me your help in order that I may reach the safe harbour of eternal salvation. Glory be to the Father, etc.

8. O compassionate St. Anthony, you who have freed so many condemned prisoners during your life, obtain for me the grace that I be freed from the bonds of sin and live in the grace of God for all eternity. Glory be to the Father, etc..

9. O holy Thaumaturge, you who have had the gift of reuniting to the body limbs that have been cut off, grant that I may never be separated from the love of God, and the unity of the Church. Glory be to the Father, etc.

10. O Saint Anthony, you who have always helped to find lost objects, grant that I may never lose God’s friendship, but that I may conserve it faithfully throughout my life. Glory be to the Father, etc.

11. O patron of the poor, you who listen to those who turn to you, receive my prayer and present it to God that He might grant me His assistance. Glory be to the Father, etc.

12. O St. Anthony, you who were the untiring apostle of the word of God, grant that I may bear witness to my faith with words and deeds. Glory be to the Father, etc.

13. O most beloved St. Anthony, you who have your blessed tomb in Padua, look upon my needs, may your miraculous tongue speak to God for me, that my prayers may be heard. Glory be to the Father, etc.

Pray for us St. Anthony. Make us worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray.

Almighty and Eternal God, you who in St. Anthony of Padua have given to Your people an illustrious preacher of the Gospel and a patron of the poor and the suffering, grant to us, through your intercession, to follow your teaching on Christian life and to experience, in trials, the help of your mercy. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

If then you ask for miracles (translation of the “Si quaeris”)

If then you ask for miracles,
Death, error and all calamities,
Leprosy and demons fly,
And health succeeds infirmities.

The sea obeys and fetters break,
And lifeless limbs you do restore;
While treasures lost are found again,
When young and old your aid implore.

All dangers vanish at your prayer,
And direst need does quickly flee;
Let those who know your power proclaim,
Let Paduans say: these are of thee.

To Father, Son, may glory be
And Holy Spirit, eternally.

Pray for us St. Anthony.
Make us worthy of the promises of Christ.

Let us pray.

Lord God, may the commemoration of St. Anthony, Doctor of the Church, be a source of joy to your people, so that, strengthened by his spiritual assistance, they may become worthy of the eternal happiness of your kingdom. Through Christ our Lord, Amen.

O Blessed Tongue (by St. Bonaventure, 1263)

O blessed tongue, you who have always praised the Lord and made others praise Him, now it is clearly evident how much merit you have before the Lord!

Invocation (by St. Bonaventure)

Remember, O dear St. Anthony, that you have always helped and consoled whoever had recourse in you in his necessities.

Encouraged by the great confidence and by the certainty of not praying in vain, I too turn to you, who are so rich in merits before the Lord. Do not refuse my prayer but grant that, through your intercession, it will reach the throne of God.

Come to my aid in my present distress and necessity, and obtain for me the grace that I ardently implore, if it is for the good of my soul. Bless my work and keep sicknesses and dangers of soul and body far from my family. Grant that in time of suffering and trial I may remain strong in faith and in the love of God. Amen.

Prayer for the family

Dear St. Anthony, we turn to you to ask your protection for our family. Called by God, you left your house to consecrate your life to good works for your neighbour, and have come to the aid of countless families, even with wondrous deeds, to bring peace and serenity everywhere.

Our dear patron, intervene in our favour: obtain for us health of body and spirit from God, grant that we may share in a true communion which will enable us to open ourselves to love for our neighbour; grant that our family be, like the Holy Family of Nazareth, a small house of God and that every family in the world may become a shrine to life and love. Amen.

Prayer for the Protection of Children

O Saint Anthony, we turn to you to place that which we hold most precious and dear under your protection: our children.

While you were immersed in prayer, the Baby Jesus appeared to you. While you were leaving this world you were comforted by the vision of our Lord, and little children spread the news of your blessed death: look upon these children who we place in your care; help them to grow, as Jesus grew, in age, knowledge and grace.

Help them to preserve their innocence and their simplicity of heart; grant that they may always have the attentive affection and wise guidance of their parents. Watch over them that as they grow in years they may reach full maturity and, as Christians, be examples of perfect faith.

O Saint Anthony, our patron, be close to all children and comfort us too with your continuous protection. Amen.

Pilgrim’s prayer at the Tomb of St. Anthony

Dear St. Anthony, look kindly upon me as I stand at your blessed tomb.

In my many needs, I have come here to pray to you, confident that in your compassionate goodness you will answer me. Present my petition to God. Through your intercession, may He grant my particular request…

My faith is weak; yours was firm and constant. Through your preaching you brought to life the faith of others; strengthen my commitment to the Good News of our Lord Jesus Christ. Make me a faithful member of His people now so that I may praise the Father later in heaven.

Glorious St. Anthony, come to my aid; protect me from all spiritual and bodily harm, and encourage me in my moments of trial and suffering. Bless my family and work. Be generous and kind toward your petitioners at your tomb and to those scattered throughout the world. Amen.

Weekday:

  • 6.30 – 7.30 – 8.15 – 9.00 – 10.00 – 11.00
  • Afternoon: 16.00 (in winter) – 17.00 -18.00 (in summer)

Weekend:

  • Morning: 6.30 – 7.15 – 8.00 – 9.00 – 10.00 – 11.00 (sung) – 12.15
  • Afternoon: 16.00 – 17.00 -18.00 – 19.00

Summer timetable:

  • From Monday to Saturday: 6.30-12.00 13.30-19.30
  • Sunday 6.30-12.30 14.00-19.30

Winter timetable:

  • From Monday to Friday 6.30-12.00 13.30-18.30 (Thursday: 18.00)
  • Saturday 6.30-12.00 13.30-19.30
  • Sunday 6.30-12.30 14.00-19.30

Posted in Europe, Italy and Top Shrines

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