St Patrick’s Cathedral New York city

St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, Združene države Amerike

Website of the Sanctuary

+1 212 753 2261

Daily: 6:30am to 8:45pm

St Patrick’s Cathedral

St Patrick’s Cathedral is the Mother Church of the Archdiocese of New York and the seat of its Archbishop. Built by contributions large and small, it remains emblematic of the ascendance of religious freedom in the New World.

As such, this international landmark is a beacon of hope for those who share the Catholic faith and a source of inspiration to the more than five million visitors of every religious denomination welcomed here each year.

Christmas Midnight Mass

The only Mass that requires tickets during Christmas is the Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. If you would like to acquire tickets for this, please send in a request letter with a self addressed return envelope.

See more Catholic Shrines and pilgrimages in North America

See top 15 Catholic shrines in the world

St Patrick’s Cathedral has been a wellspring of hope and solace in times of peace and plenty and war and sorrow. In a city and nation of immigrants, it has greeted countless waves of peoples seeking freedom.

St Patrick’s Cathedral anchors us all to such basic human virtues as charity, love, decency, strength and justice. While the surrounding urban environment has seen constant change, St Patrick’s Cathedral has stood strong, overlooking Fifth Avenue, since its dedication in 1879. See also Basilica of Regina Pacis in Brooklyn

Top 10 recommended hotels near Saint Patrick’s Cathedral in New York

No single generation builds a cathedral. The vibrancy of its windows, the beauty of its music and the purpose of its charitable outreach call us to respond to our shared humanity – one in the image and likeness of God, saved by his Son, Jesus Christ, in the family of the Church.

The heart of St Patrick’s Cathedral is the faith, work and generosity of good people bringing God’s presence into the world, inspiring a conversation among the generations.

The story of New York’s great cathedral mirrors the story of the city itself. Created to affirm the ascendance of religious freedom and tolerance, St Patrick’s Cathedral was built in the democratic spirit, paid for not only by the contributions of thousands of poor immigrants but also by the largesse of 103 prominent citizens who pledged $1,000 each.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral proves the maxim that no generation builds a cathedral. It is rather, a kind of ongoing conversation linking generations past, present and future.

The cornerstone of St. Patrick’s Cathedral was laid in 1858 and her doors swept open in 1879. It was over 150 years ago when Archbishop John Hughes announced his inspired ambition to build the “new” St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

In a ceremony at Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Archbishop Hughes proposed “for the glory of Almighty God, for the honor of the Blessed and Immaculate Virgin, for the exaltation of Holy Mother Church, for the dignity of our ancient and glorious Catholic name, to erect a Cathedral in the City of New York that may be worthy of our increasing numbers, intelligence, and wealth as a religious community, and at all events, worthy as a public architectural monument, of the present and prospective crowns of this metropolis of the American continent.”

Christmas Midnight Mass

The only Mass that requires tickets during Christmas is the Midnight Mass on Christmas Eve. If you would like to acquire tickets for this, please send in a request letter with a self addressed return envelope.

St. Patrick’s Cathedral receives thousands of requests each year and send tickets first come first serve by date they are received. They start accepting ticket requests at the end of the Summer.

Please send ticket request to:
St. Patrick’s Cathedral
460 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10022

SATURDAY:

  • 5:30 PM Music

 SUNDAY:

  • 7:00 AM 
  • 8:00 AM 
  • 9:00 AM Music
  • 10:15 AM Choir
  • 12:00 PM Music
  • 1:00 PM 
  • 4:00 PM Spanish Mass Music
  • 5:30 PM Music

MON – FRI:

  • 7:00 AM Music
  • 7:30 AM
  • 8:00 AM
  • 12:00 PM Music
  • 12:30 PM Music
  • 1:00 PM Music
  • 5:30 PM Music on Mondays and Fridays only

SATURDAY:

  • 8:00 AM in Lady Chapel
  • 12:00 PM

Devotions in the Lady Chapel

Popular devotional practices play a crucial role in helping to foster a strong prayer life. At St. Patrick’s Cathedral, there are a variety of opportunities during the week to get involved in devotional prayer.

All of the below follow the 5:30PM weekday Mass – unless otherwise noted – and take place in the Lady Chapel.

  • Monday: Devotion to the Miraculous Medal
  • Tuesday: Pray the Rosary
  • Wednesday: Evening Prayer
  • Thursday: Pray the Rosary
  • Friday: The Litany of the Sacred Heart

During Lent, the Stations of the Cross are at 6:00PM every Wednesday and Friday, with the exception of Ash Wednesday.

The story of New York’s great cathedral mirrors the story of the city itself. Created to affirm the ascendance of religious freedom and tolerance, St. Patrick’s Cathedral was built in the democratic spirit, paid for not only by the contributions of thousands of poor immigrants but also by the largesse of 103 prominent citizens who pledged $1,000 each. St. Patrick’s Cathedral proves the maxim that no generation builds a cathedral. It is rather, a kind of ongoing conversation linking generations past, present and future.

The cornerstone of St. Patrick’s Cathedral was laid in 1858 and her doors swept open in 1879. It was over 150 years ago when Archbishop John Hughes announced his inspired ambition to build the “new” St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

In a ceremony at Old St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Archbishop Hughes proposed “for the glory of Almighty God, for the honor of the Blessed and Immaculate Virgin, for the exaltation of Holy Mother Church, for the dignity of our ancient and glorious Catholic name, to erect a Cathedral in the City of New York that may be worthy of our increasing numbers, intelligence, and wealth as a religious community, and at all events, worthy as a public architectural monument, of the present and prospective crowns of this metropolis of the American continent.”

Ridiculed as “Hughes’ Folly,” as the proposed, near-wilderness site was considered too far outside the city, Archbishop Hughes, nonetheless, persisted in his daring vision of building the most beautiful Gothic Cathedral in the New World in what he believed would one day be “the heart of the city.” Neither the bloodshed of the Civil War nor the resultant lack of manpower or funds would derail the ultimate fulfillment of Hughes’ dream and architect, James Renwick’s bold plan.

1785 – In New York City there were only two hundred Catholics and one priest. The predecessor church of St. Patrick’s Cathedral was dedicated to the Prince of the Apostles – Saint Peter – and was built and dedicated on Barclay Street in lower Manhattan. It is the oldest Roman Catholic parish in New York City Today.

1805 – Mrs. Elizabeth Bayley Seton, founder of the Sisters of Charity in this country, was converted to Catholicism and made her profession of faith, received first communion and was confirmed in the old Saint Peter’s Church.

1808 – The Diocese of New York was created and comprised the entire State of New York and the eastern part of New Jersey. It was one of four suffrage sees within the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

1809 – The recent elevation of New York as an episcopal see with its own bishop inspired the increasing Catholic population to build the original Cathedral of New York under the name of Ireland’s patron saint, Saint Patrick. The site chosen belonged to the corporation of Saint Peter’s Church and was located on Mulberry Street in lower Manhattan. The cornerstone was laid in June 1809.

1815 – A news article in the New York Gazette declared: “The new Catholic church in this city was last Thursday, Ascension Day, solemnly dedicated to God under the name of Saint Patrick. This grand and beautiful church, which may justly be considered one of the greatest ornaments of our city, and inferior in point of elegance to none in the United States, is built in the Gothic style and executed agreeable to the design of Mr. Joseph Mangin, the celebrated architect of New York. The superior elegance of the architecture, as well as the beauty of the interior, had for some months past excited a considerable degree of public curiosity. Upwards of four thousand persons consisting of the best families of New York attended the dedication,” which was begun in 1809 and lately so far completed as to be fit for divine service,

1842 – Bishop John Hughes became Bishop of New York. His cathedral was the largest church structure in New York City, where he safely guided the growth of the city’s Catholic population during a time of much religious bigotry and turmoil.

1850 – New York became an archdiocese and Bishop Hughes became the first archbishop.

1853 – Archbishop Hughes announced plans “to erect a Cathedral in the City of New York that may be worthy of our increasing numbers, intelligence and wealth as a religious community, and at all events, worthy, as a public architectural monument, of the present and prospective crowns of this metropolis of the American continent.”

1853 – Renowned architect James Renwick was engaged to design the current Cathedral at a cost of approximately $850,000, not including the altars, furnishings for chapels, organs and other furniture. The stone chosen was white marble.

1858 – The cornerstone of the new St. Patrick’s Cathedral, whose boundaries would be between Fifth and Madison Avenues and Fiftieth and Fifty-First Streets, was laid on the site of the old Saint John’s Church on August 15, 1858. Construction of the new Cathedral progressed rapidly until interrupted by the Civil War and the need for additional funding.

1864 – After the death of the beloved Archbishop Hughes, Bishop John McCloskey was installed Archbishop of New York. Construction of the Cathedral resumed shortly after the close of the war.

1866 – On the night of October 6, 1866, old historic St. Patrick’s on Mulberry Street was destroyed by fire; the Cathedral was rebuilt within the four original walls that remained and dedicated on Saint Patrick’s Day 1868.

1875 – The first American Cardinal, Cardinal John McCloskey, was invested in the old Cathedral.

1878 – A fund- raising fair was held in the new St. Patrick’s Cathedral, with forty-five parishes sponsoring tables. Receipts of $172,625 were raised to assist in purchasing furnishings for the Cathedral.

1879 – St. Patrick’s Cathedral was opened formally on May 25, 1879. The newspapers hailed the new Cathedral as “the noblest temple ever raised in any land to the memory of Saint Patrick, and as the glory of Catholic America.”

1884 – On the occasion of his fiftieth anniversary as a priest, Cardinal McCloskey was presented with the beautiful marble pulpit as a gift from the clergy.

1888 – The spires of the Cathedral were completed during the stewardship of Archbishop Michael Corrigan.

1900 – Construction of the Lady Chapel was begun and the first Mass was offered in the Chapel on Christmas 1906. Construction with all furnishings was completed in 1908.

1909 – The first of the Lady Chapel stained glass windows was installed with the remainder to follow over the next twenty-five years. They were designed and constructed in England, France and Germany.

1910 – On October 5, 1910, the Cathedral became free from debt and was solemnly consecrated by Archbishop Farley who later was made Cardinal. It was estimated that over $4 million had been spent from start to the day of consecration.

1927 – In honor of the 50th Anniversary of the dedication of the Cathedral, Cardinal Hayes inaugurated the largest renovation project in the history of the Cathedral up to that time. The sanctuary was enlarged, the choir gallery was rebuilt, new chancel and gallery organs were built, a new baptistery was added and new nave flooring and pews were put in place. The sanctuary was enclosed by an oak screen and a handsomely designed altar railing was added.

1936 – On October 11, 1936, Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli, who later became Pope Pius XII, presided at the 26th anniversary of the consecration of the Cathedral.

1941-1947 – Cardinal Spellman found benefactors to underwrite many improvements including many new upper windows, the bronze doors, a new high altar and Lady Chapel altar and extensive repairs of the marble exterior facade.

1942 – The new Lady Chapel altar and new high altar and baldachin, more appropriate for a Gothic cathedral design, were consecrated by Archbishop Spellman. The famous stained glass artisan Charles Connick designed a number of upper windows and the rose window. The architect of the renovations was Charles Maginnis of Maginnis and Walsh.

1950’s – Installation of the upper windows was completed. The crowning stained glass work was the installation of the grand rose window over the west portal.

1972 – During Cardinal Cooke’s administration the entire interior of the Cathedral was restored.

1979 – Restoration of the exterior was completed for the Cathedral’s 100th anniversary.

1984-2000 – During Cardinal O’Connor’s episcopate, extensive renovations were made to maintain the structural integrity of the building, including replacement of much of the roof, resetting the exterior steps, repainting the transept walls and refinishing the transept doors. The Cathedral’s organs were rebuilt and television monitors were added so that all congregants at services might be able to participate fully in the liturgy. The bells were restored and a new lighting system was installed.

2000-2009 – During Cardinal Egan’s episcopate, the Lady Chapel, including windows, was cleaned and restored. The restoration of the altar of Saint Anthony was completed and a fine bas-relief of Saint Frances Cabrini was mounted. The sanctuary with its two altars, the sacristy, the baldachin and the great carved wood screen around the sanctuary were restored to their original splendor. A new shrine dedicated to Our Lady of Czestochowa and various saints of Poland was dedicated as was the restored Saint Andrew’s Chapel.

2000 – At a June 19, 2000 Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral attended by many dignitaries and graced by the beautiful voice of soprano Renée Fleming, Edward Egan was appointed Archbishop of New York, proclaiming “We are a people of faith. We are a people of prayer. We are a people of justice. We are a people of charity. That is our formula.” Archbishop Egan would be elevated to the cardinalate in 2001.

2001 – On September 16, 2001 Cardinal Egan presided over a memorial mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral for the victims of the September 11 attacks. He praised the public servants of New York who selflessly and heroically rushed to the scene. See 9/11 Mass of Supplication and Remembering the Heroes of 9/11.

2007-2008 – The Archdiocese of New York celebrated its Bicentennial with many celebratory Masses and events. Edward Cardinal Egan hosted a much-heralded concert featuring various choirs and stars from the Metropolitan Opera.

2008 – On April 19, 2008, Pope Benedict XVI became the first Pope to celebrate Mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral. His Holiness called upon all who were present to be heralds of hope— and to look to the spires of St. Patrick’s as a symbol of the spiritual yearning of the human heart. See video excerpt.

2009 – On April 15, 2009 in a joyful Mass of Installation at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, His Excellency Timothy Dolan was installed as the 10th Archbishop of New York saying: “I pledge to you my love, my life, my heart, and I can tell you already that I love you. I need so much your prayers and support. I am so honored, humbled, and happy to serve as your pastor.”

2011 and the Future – Plans are put in place to launch a major effort to preserve St. Patrick’s for generations to come.

Top 10 recommended hotels

Tips and Recommendations

1 Hotel Central Park

1 Hotel Central Park

  • The hotel is 300 m from Carnegie Hall, 500 m from Museum of Modern Art and 600 m from Central Park. Newark Liberty International Airport is 19 km away.
  • Offering a restaurant and a fitness centre. Each room here will provide you with air conditioning and a seating area. Featuring a shower, private bathrooms.
  • This is a modern new hotel, with brilliant and very friendly staff. Really good view of Central Park.
  • 5 stars
  • 0.7 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Superb 9.1, Location 9.7, 1,154 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

See more recommendations list for hotels near other Catholic shrines:

Barcelona – La Sagrada Familia
Fatima – Sanctuary of Our Lady
Florence – Piazza del Duomo
Lourdes – Sanctuary of Our Lady
Medjugorje – Medjugorje Sanctuary
Milan – The Duomo Cathedral
Paris – Notre Dame Cathedral
Rome – St Peter’s Basilica

Warwick New York

Warwick New York

  • Has a beautiful restaurant with walls covered in 1930s artwork. Its just 5 blocks from Central Park. Valet parking and ticket services are available.
  • Rooms with a marble bathroom and minibar. Satellite TV, on-demand movies and ironing facilities are included. A fitness center with cardio equipment, weights and TVs is open to all guests of the New York Warwick. A business center, shoe shining and laundry services are also available.
  • 5 stars
  • 0.4 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Fabulous 8.7, Location 9.5, 2,784 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

New York Marriott Marquis

New York Marriott Marquis

  • Located in the heart of Times Square and the Broadway theater district, this 4-star hotel features 3 dining options, including a revolving rooftop restaurant.
  • You can enjoy continental cuisine at the revolving rooftop View Restaurant, or American cuisine at Crossroads American Kitchen & Bar. Alternatively, the Broadway Lounge offers cocktails and light refreshments. Views from the city view room are just incredible.
  • 4 stars
  • 0.8 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Very good 8.2, Location 9.4, 6,059 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

citizenM New York Times Square

citizenM New York Times Square

  • This hotel is just 1 minute’s walk from Times Square and within 5 minutes’ walk of Central Park and Columbus Circle. Rockefeller Center and the Empire State Building are within 15 minutes’ walk.
  • Rooms feature a centralized digital system that controls lighting, music and electronics. Bathrooms include rain showers and oversized bathroom amenities. Wi-Fi and movies are provided free of charge.
  • This is a funky hotel in brilliant location with the most comfortable beds and rooftop bar.
  • 4 stars
  • 0.8 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews:  Superb 9.0, Location 9.6, 6,064 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Residence Inn by Marriott New York Manhattan/Central Park

Residence Inn by Marriott New York Manhattan/Central Park

  • Its located in central Manhattan, this hotel is 5 minutes’ walk to Central Park and features rooms with a kitchenette.
  • Free Wi-Fi is available throughout the place. A fitness centre is available for your use. The front desk is open 24-hours. A hot breakfast is served every morning.
  • Rooms are compact but well laid out so feels very comfortable and not cramped.
  • 3 stars
  • 0.8 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Fabulous 8.6, Location 9.5, 2,087 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Broadway at Times Square Hotel

Broadway at Times Square Hotel

  • This  hotel is steps from Times Square. Features a 24-hour gym, daily continental breakfast and rooms with free Wi-Fi.
  • Every room has a tea- and coffee-making facilities and an iPod docking station. A flat-screen cable TV with pay-per-view movies as well as free nationwide calling within the United States are available in the rooms.
  • 3 stars
  • 0.6 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Very good 8.4, Location 9.5, 3,602 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Midtown Lodging

Midtown Lodging

  • The studio apartment at Midtown Lodging features an alcove sleeping area with Apple TV and arm chairs. A fully equipped kitchen, dining table, and a sofa bed are also provided.
  • Just 8 min’ from the United Nations, boasts free Wi-Fi, 24-hour security and a flat-screen TV. Rockefeller Center is 12 minutes’ walk away. It’s good money value
  • 2 stars
  • 0.8 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Good 7.6, 174 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Times Square Studio 46

Times Square Studio 46

  • Times Square is 200 m from the property. Free WiFi is provided .
  • This non-smoking property features air conditioned accommodation and a flat-screen TV. There is also a kitchen, fitted with an oven. There is a private bathroom with a bath or shower in each unit. Towels are available.
  • 0.6 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Apartment near Times Square

Apartment near Times Square

  • Its 300 m from Broadway Theatre and 600 m from Carnegie Hall. Free WiFi is offered within the apartment, and there is a portable WiFi device.
  • Kitchen is fully equipped and the location was very good. Towels and bed linen are provided in this self-catering accommodation. There is a private bathroom with a bath or shower.
  • 1 star
  • 1.1 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Superb 9.4, Location 9.7, 9 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

Manhattan Studio Apartments

Manhattan Studio Apartments

  • Features studio apartments with a kitchen. Free WiFi access is available. The property is 200 m from Empire State Building.
  • A cable TV, hardwood floors and a sofa are provided in every apartment. Bathrooms also come with a hairdryer and free toiletries.
  • 1 star
  • 1.6 km from St Patrick’s Cathedral
  • Ratings and reviews: Good 7.2., 119 reviews
  • Compare prices or go directly to Booking.com

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