Glendalough Monastic site and Visitor centre

Glendalough Monastic Site, Glendalough, Irska

Website of the Sanctuary

+353 (0) 404 200 70

Every day: 24 hours

Glendalough Monastic site

Glendalough is home to one of the most important monastic sites in Ireland. This early Christian monastic settlement was founded by St. Kevin in the 6th century and from this developed the “Monastic City”. Most of the buildings that survive today date from the 10th through 12th centuries.

Despite attacks by Vikings over the years, Glendalough thrived as one of Ireland’s great ecclesiastical foundations and schools of learning until the Normans destroyed the monastery in 1214 A.D. and the dioceses of Glendalough and Dublin were united. Close to the monastic city is the interactive centre. The centre features an audio visual and has a model of the monastic site on display.

Monastic city of Glendalough

See more Ireland’s catholic shrines and pilgrimages.

See Top 15 Catholic shrines in the world.

See more European catholic shrines and pilgrimages.

Coming to Glendalough and having the best stay:

Guides and tours in Glendalough:

The Round Tower

The most famous of all the landmarks in Glendalough is the Round Tower which stands 33 meters above the ground. It was built almost 1000 years ago by the monks of St. Kevin’s monastery.

The conical roof had to be replaced in 1876 when it was struck by lightning. The towers were called “Cloigtheach”, meaning bell tower, suggesting their main use. The towers were sometimes used as a place of refuge for monks when the monastery was under attack. They also served as both as lookout posts and as beacons foe approaching monks and pilgrims.

Monastic city of Glendalough

The Cathedral

The Cathedral is the largest of the seven churches in Glendalough.  It was built in several phases from the 10th through the early 13th century. Large mica schist stones, which form the foundation up to the height of the west doorway, were re-used from an earlier smaller church.

The earliest part is the nave with antae for supporting the wooden roof. The chancel, sacristy, and north door were added in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. The north doorway to the nave also dates from this period. Inside there is a wall cupboard, a stone font, many grave slabs, and the remains of a decorated arch.

St. Kevin’s Kitchen

St. Kevin’s Church better known as St. Kevin’s Kitchen is a nave-and-chancel church of the 12th century. It is called St Kevin’s kitchen because people believed that the bell tower was a chimney to a kitchen but really no food was ever cooked there.

This stone-roofed building originally had a nave only, with entrance at the west end and a small round-headed window in the east gable. The belfry with its conical cap and four small windows rises from the west end of the stone roof in the form of a miniature round tower.

Monastic city of Glendalough

St. Kevin’s Cross

St. Kevin’s Cross is a fine example of a plain cross remarkably carved from a single granite stone. The arms of the cross are over a metre in length. The imperforate cross stands about 2.5m tall. It may have marked the boundary of the cemetery in which stands the priests’ house.

This cross is a fine example of how St Patrick trying to help the once pagan people of Ireland acclimate to Christianity. This was done by combining the cross with the circle representing the sun, because the pagans worshipped the sun and moon.

A local legend surrounding St. Kevin’s Cross says that anyone who can wrap their arms around the entire width of the cross body and close the circle by touching fingertips will have their wishes granted. So when you visit be sure to try your luck see if all your wishes will be granted.

The Trinity Church

The Trinity Church is part of the monastic settlements in the Glendalough Valley. The Church probably dates from the 12th Century. The church is located some 500 meters from Glendalough Visitor Centre, on the road from Laragh to Glendalough.

Monastic city of Glendalough

Glendalough Visitor Centre

The visitor centre brings visitors back in time to the golden age of Irish History: the Ireland of Scholars and Saints. Follow the footsteps of St. Kevin, founder of Glendalough. The audio-visual show is available in many languages as well as guided tours of the permanent exhibition. The visitor centre is open daily throughout the year and is a must before entering the Monastic Site.

Visitor Centre is fully accessible for visitors with disabilities. Access to the graveyard is very difficult for wheelchair users. The Education Centre provides a range of courses and tours for schoolchildren, students and other groups. These are related to nature conservation and the ecology of the National Park. The centre is accessible for people with disabilities.

View hotel deals:



Booking.com

Let us remain close in the same prayer! May the Lord bless you abundantly!

Glendalough Visitor Centre

The visitor centre brings visitors back in time to the golden age of Irish History: the Ireland of Scholars and Saints. Follow the footsteps of St. Kevin, founder of Glendalough. The audio-visual show is available in many languages as well as guided tours of the permanent exhibition. The visitor centre is open daily throughout the year and is a must before entering the Monastic Site.

Visitor Centre is fully accessible for visitors with disabilities. Access to the graveyard is very difficult for wheelchair users. The Education Centre provides a range of courses and tours for schoolchildren, students and other groups. These are related to nature conservation and the ecology of the National Park. The centre is accessible for people with disabilities.

Glendalough is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Wicklow and indeed all of Ireland. It is unsurprising given the stunning landscape, historic ruins and beautiful walks on offer at this unique location. Glendalough (or Gleann Da Loch, meaning ‘The Glen of the Two Lakes’) is situated in the heart of the Wicklow Mountains National Park, which has over one million visitors every year.

The ancient monastery on the site is a fascinating site, having been founded in the 6th century by St. Kevin. Set in a glaciated valley with two lakes, the monastic remains include a superb round tower, stone churches and decorated crosses. The round tower is one of the most recognizable landmarks in the area. The site also includes a Celtic high cross, St. Mary’s Church and St. Kevin’s Church. The remains of three stone crosses and a stone fort are also to be found between the upper and lower lakes.

Let us remain close in the same prayer! May the Lord bless you abundantly!

The county lies directly beside the capital city, with access to Dublin Airport. Two ferry ports are also in close proximity to the county, in Dun Laoghaire and Rosslare. Once you arrive, there is a wide choice of transport from bus to train, taxi to coach and more.

Let us remain close in the same prayer! May the Lord bless you abundantly!

The Round Tower

The most famous of all the landmarks in Glendalough is the Round Tower which stands 33 meters above the ground. It was built almost 1000 years ago by the monks of St. Kevin’s monastery. The conical roof had to be replaced in 1876 when it was struck by lightning. The towers were called “Cloigtheach”, meaning bell tower, suggesting their main use. The towers were sometimes used as a place of refuge for monks when the monastery was under attack. They also served as both as lookout posts and as beacons foe approaching monks and pilgrims.

The Cathedral

The Cathedral is the largest of the seven churches in Glendalough.  It was built in several phases from the 10th through the early 13th century. Large mica schist stones, which form the foundation up to the height of the west doorway, were re-used from an earlier smaller church. The earliest part is the nave with antae for supporting the wooden roof. The chancel, sacristy, and north door were added in the late 12th and early 13th centuries. The north doorway to the nave also dates from this period. Inside there is a wall cupboard, a stone font, many grave slabs, and the remains of a decorated arch.

St. Kevin’s Kitchen

St. Kevin’s Church better known as St. Kevin’s Kitchen is a nave-and-chancel church of the 12th century. It is called St Kevin’s kitchen because people believed that the bell tower was a chimney to a kitchen but really no food was ever cooked there. This stone-roofed building originally had a nave only, with entrance at the west end and a small round-headed window in the east gable. The belfry with its conical cap and four small windows rises from the west end of the stone roof in the form of a miniature round tower.

St. Kevin’s Cross

St. Kevin’s Cross is a fine example of a plain cross remarkably carved from a single granite stone. The arms of the cross are over a metre in length. The imperforate cross stands about 2.5m tall. It may have marked the boundary of the cemetery in which stands the priests’ house. This cross is a fine example of how St Patrick trying to help the once pagan people of Ireland acclimate to Christianity. This was done by combining the cross with the circle representing the sun, because the pagans worshipped the sun and moon.

A local legend surrounding St. Kevin’s Cross says that anyone who can wrap their arms around the entire width of the cross body and close the circle by touching fingertips will have their wishes granted. So when you visit be sure to try your luck see if all your wishes will be granted.

The Trinity Church

The Trinity Church is part of the monastic settlements in the Glendalough Valley. The Church probably dates from the 12th Century. The church is located some 500 meters from Glendalough Visitor Centre, on the road from Laragh to Glendalough.

Let us remain close in the same prayer! May the Lord bless you abundantly!

Posted in Europe and Ireland