Amalfi Cathedral Italy – Mass times, Opening times and Entrance fee

Amalfi Cathedral, Amalfi, Salerno, Italija

Website of the Sanctuary

+39 089 871 485

Every day: from 7.00 to 19.30.

Coming to Amalfi and having the best stay:

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Hotels:

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Getting around

Insurance: Travel Insurance for Italy, Europe
Flights: Flights to Naples (NAP-Naples Intl.)
Things to do: Sightseeing in Amalfi 
Forum: FAQ about Amalfi and getting around
Cars: Rent a car
Rail Europe: Train to Neaples near Amalfi
Books: Amalfi coast travel guides
UNESCO: World heritage site – Amalfi with architectural and artistic works of great significance.
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The Amalfi Coast is located in Italy’s Campania region, south of Naples. The main transportation hubs for the Amalfi Coast are Naples, Sorrento, and Salerno. The principal forms of public transport serving the Amalfi Coast are Sita coaches and, in the summer, ferries.

For those traveling from the North, the first town you will reach on the Amalfi Coast is Positano. Continuing along the twisting coastal Strada Statale 163 road, you will pass the towns of Praiano, Amalfi, Minori, Maiori, Cetara, and Vietri sul Mare.

The only railway station on the Amalfi Coast is located in Vietri sul Mare, which is linked with the stations of Naples and Salerno. Unfortunately, there is no direct public transport between Naples and Positano.

Amalfi Cathedral Italy with the remains of St. Andrew. Amalfi cathedral mass times

 

Guides and tours in Amalfi:

See more Italian Catholic shrines and Basilicas

See more European Catholic Shrines and pilgrimages

Amalfi Cathedral

Amalfi Cathedral is a 9th-century Roman Catholic structure in the Piazza del Duomo, Amalfi, Italy.

It is dedicated to the Apostle Saint Andrew, it has been remodeled several times, adding Romanesque, Byzantine, Gothic, and Baroque elements. The cathedral includes the adjoining 9th century Basilica of the Crucifix. Leading from the basilica are steps into the Crypt of St. Andrew.

The Interior of the Amalfi Cathedral

A wooden 13th century Crucifix hangs in the liturgical area. Another crucifix, made of mother-of-pearl, was brought from the Holy Land and is located to the right of the back door.

The High Altar in the central nave is formed from the sarcophagus of the Archbishop Pietro Capuano (died 1214). Above the altar is a painting by Andrea dell’Asta of The Martyrdom of St. Andrew.

The boxed ceiling dates to 1702 and its artwork includes the Flagellation, the Crucifixion of the Apostle, and the Dell’Asta’s 1710 Miracle of the Manna.

The remains of St. Andrew

The newer cathedral was built next to the older basilica that was built on the ruins of a previous temple. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade by Cardinal Peter of Capua.

In 1208, the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. It said that later on Manna issued from the saint’s bones.

Amalfi cathedral Mass times:

Sunday:

  • 7.30
  • 10.00
  • 11.15
  • 18.30

Monday – Saturday:

  • 8.00
  • 18.00

The Amalfi Coast is located in Italy’s Campania region, south of Naples. The main transportation hubs for the Amalfi Coast are Naples, Sorrento, and Salerno. The principal forms of public transport serving the Amalfi Coast are Sita coaches and, in the summer, ferries.

For those traveling from the North, the first town you will reach on the Amalfi Coast is Positano. Continuing along the twisting coastal Strada Statale 163 road, you will pass the towns of Praiano, Amalfi, Minori, Maiori, Cetara, and Vietri sul Mare. The only railway station on the Amalfi Coast is located in Vietri sul Mare, which is linked with the stations of Naples and Salerno. Unfortunately, there is no direct public transport between Naples and Positano.

The remains of St. Andrew

The newer cathedral was built next to the older basilica that was built on the ruins of a previous temple. The remains of St. Andrew were reportedly brought to Amalfi from Constantinople in 1206 during the Fourth Crusade by Cardinal Peter of Capua. In 1208, the crypt was completed and the relics were turned over to the church. It said that later on Manna issued from the saint’s bones.

“Amalfi BW 2013-05-15 10-09-21 1 DxO” by Berthold Werner.
“Artus Wolffort – St Andrew – WGA25857” by Artus Wolffort

Posted in Europe and Italy